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82 Hertz: Dominant ninth arpeggio patterns

Dominant ninth arpeggio

Here are some of the standard fingering patterns for playing dominant ninth chord arpeggios. As usual, the root note is emphasized. The patterns are not named because they generally span more than one type of chord pattern.

I was stumped on what this pattern was. That was because I started using it as a variation on the Major Pentatonic scale. The notes are the major pentatonic, with the 6th replaced by a flatted 7th. I took me a while to realize that it was an arpeggiated ninth.

There are four things that can help you remember how to play these patterns:

  • They are dominant seventh arpeggios with an added note.
  • They are the same notes as dominant ninth chords. Use the chord forms to help you get started.
  • They are the same as the major pentatonic scales, except for the note described above.
  • They are minor seventh flatted 5 arpeggios with an added note, however the root note of the arpeggio is not the root of the ninth chord.

The same chords and patterns are shown in both a vertical and a horizontal display because some people have trouble with one form or the other.

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Starting on the chord's root

This ascending pattern has the same 3-note and 2-note per sting pattern repeated up the neck.

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This root pattern is fairly easy to remember. The E, A and D strings form an "H-shaped" pattern.

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This expanded "H-shape" highlights the interesting pattern the notes make on the first three strings (E, A and D). Think about how this pattern could be used to help you remember the scale in other positions, or to transition from one pattern to another.

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Starting on the chord's nine

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Starting on the chord's third

I found this to be one of the easist shapes to remember, and very useful. It wraps around a C7 chord.

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Starting on the chord's fifth

Look for the ninth chord form that most people use when they first learn a ninth chord in the first pattern below (the C-form), where the root is on the A string.

In the first two patterns, the low 7th note is played on either the E or A string. These are very useful patterns, with the low notes around the C form and the higher notes around the A form. The first pattern highlights how similar this physical pattern-shape is to a major or minor pentatonic.

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The main assending pattern. This is a repeating pattern that climbs the fretboard.

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The H-shape is central to these patterns and they are the same on the E, A, D and G strings. The first is easier to remember because of its repeating shapes. The second climbs the fretboard a bit more to end on the root.

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Starting on the chord's seventh

Compare the the first pattern below to the G-form of the major pentatonic.

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Using the patterns

The notes in these patterns are ninth chords. If you consider the patterns they are related to in the list above, you'll get some hints of ways to use them. How about using it over a dom seven chord?